Maria Sarapova, Banned For Two Years, Doping Case, Sarapova to Appeal in International Court

Sharapova said she had gotten email notice about changes to the banned rundown for 2016 yet did not read it. She said she had been taking meldonium, otherwise called Mildronate, since 2006 to deal with an assortment of wellbeing issues.

Maria Sharapova was suspended for a long time by the International Tennis Federation on Wednesday for testing positive for an execution upgrading substance.

Sharapova, 29, reported in March that she had tried positive for meldonium on Jan. 26 at the Australian Open and started serving a temporary suspension. Meldonium, a heart prescription that is said to enhance blood stream and permit competitors to recuperate speedier, was added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's denied list in January after the office checked its utilization for a year.

Sharapova, a five-time Grand Slam champion whose positioning has dropped to 26th on account of wounds and her suspension, is the most noteworthy profile tennis player to have a positive doping test. For as long as 11 years, she was the world's most generously compensated female competitor, as indicated by Forbes. (Serena Williams surpassed Sharapova on the current year's rundown, which was discharged Monday.)

Sharapova said she had gotten email notice about changes to the banned rundown for 2016 yet did not read it. She said she had been taking meldonium, otherwise called Mildronate, since 2006 to deal with an assortment of wellbeing issues.

Sharapova had a two-day hearing on May 18 and 19 with a three-part tribunal, whose individuals are selected by the I.T.F. She confronted a suspension of up to four years if the tribunal chose her use of meldonium was purposeful. The I.T.F. said that on account of her brief affirmation of her infringement, the suspension would be predated to start on Jan. 26 and that she would be qualified to return at midnight on Jan. 25, 2018.

The tribunal governed: "The contradiction of the antidoping guidelines was not purposeful as Ms. Sharapova did not value that Mildronate contained a substance disallowed from 1 January 2016. Notwithstanding, she bears sole obligation regarding the negation, and exceptionally huge shortcoming, in neglecting to find a way to check whether the proceeded with utilization of this medication was allowable."

Sharapova said in an announcement discharged on her Facebook page that she would instantly claim the suspension through the Court of Arbitration for Sport.